Check-out this handy guide on how to pair food and wine.


The world of wine can be intimidating. From full bodied red wines to crisp dry white wines. The options are truly endless! However, when it comes to pairing wine with food there are quite a few tips and tricks to help you along the way. Check-out this guide on how to pair food and wine.

Terms to Know:

Acidity: Present in all grapes and play a role in the preservation of the wine. Wines that have a sharper and crisper taste will have higher levels of acidity.

Body: A term used to describe the flavour profile of a wine. For instance a full-bodied wine is one with a powerful flavours and strong aftertaste.

Dry: Wines that normally consist of very little to no sugars.

Tannin: A chemical compounds found in the skin, seeds, and stems of grapes. Some are incorporated in the aging of the wood barrels

Pinot Noir: Pair with earthy flavours

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Pinot Nior is known for its light body and earthy flavours; think dark berries, cherries, plums, violets, and warm spices. This red wine stands apart from others, with very few tannins, it pairs perfectly with fatty fish. This includes salmon and tuna among others. Along with fish, it pairs well with lamb, venison, and pork chops.

Chardonnay: Best with fatty fish or fish in a rich sauce

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While the specific tastes and aromas of Chardonnay can change depending on the brand, the wine generally has strong fruity flavours. With hints of green apple, pear, melon, creamy lemon, and rounded out with vanilla, it serves as a great choice for shellfish, salmon, grilled lobster, tilapia with rich sauces.

Champagne: Goes with anything savoury

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Most dry sparkling wines, such as brut Champagne and Spanish cava, actually have a faint touch of sweetness. That makes them extra-refreshing when served with salty foods, like roasted fish, grilled veggies.

Cabernet Sauvignon: Perfect with juicy red meat

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As a full body red wine, Cabernet Sauvignon is high with tannins, plum, black berry, and black currant flavours. California Cabernet, Bordeaux, and Bordeaux-style blends are terrific with steaks and dishes like lamb chops with frizzled herbs.

Sauvignon Blanc: Team up with tart dressings and sauces

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As a light bodied white wine, Sauvignon Blanc tends to be high in acidity and offer a crisp white taste. This allows for it to pair well with tart dressings and sauces, cheese, oysters, fresh herbs, salads and delicate fish.

Off-Dry Riesling: Delicious with sweet and spicy dishes

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Its light sweetness makes it a perfect complementary pairing for spicy dishes. Off-Dry Riesling also pairs well with shellfish, pork, ham, and salads. Its lack of tannins and therefore bitterness make it a great pairing for salads with vinaigrettes.

Dry Rosé: For rich, cheesy treats

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Rosé is one of the most diverse wines with its ability to have characteristics of both red and white wine. This allows for Dry Rosé to pair well with almost any cheese because of its acidity and fruity traits. As a crisp pink wine it offers a refreshing taste with low amounts of tannin and therefore little bitterness. Dry Rosé’s flavours include hints of strawberries, cherries, citrus, and herbs. This allows for it to pair well with grilled chicken and spicy seafood.


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